In which we grow an herb garden

A few weeks ago Jeff and I walked down to Seattle Tilth’s Edible Plant Sale. Their whole mission is to promote urban gardening and healthy eating, so the plants were incredibly cheap. The first year we moved in I had a basil plant that lived in our kitchen window and died after two weeks, so we were a little hesitant to commit to anything too complicated, but decided to give it a go with some herbs.

For all these plants it was $33 - a steal!

For all these plants plus another pallet it was $33 – a steal!

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The first day of the plant sale the line was two blocks long out of the park. We waited for the second day and they still had plenty of plants left.

The first day of the plant sale the line was two blocks long out of the park. We waited for the second day and they still had plenty of plants left. All this did was make me want a house where we could plant tomatoes and maybe corn. Mostly heirloom tomatoes.

In four large galvanized tubs on our small balcony we planted carrots, cilantro, dill, chives, green onions, two kinds of sweet peppers, jalapeños, basil, rosemary, peppermint, regular mint and thyme.

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They started small...

They started small…

But then they grew..

But then they grew..

And grew!

And grew!

The best thing about having an herb garden steps off the kitchen is that it’s forced us to cook more. Why let this fresh deliciousness go to waste? We’ve incorporated them into many foods, but usually they look too good for me to stop and take a picture. Jeff has been muddling mint with cold water with lime for a refreshing summer drink.

Fresh chives

Fresh chives

Great for baked potatoes

Great for baked potatoes

And fresh herbs doctor up boxed scalloped potatoes really well.

And fresh herbs doctor up boxed scalloped potatoes really well.

It’s been great seeing what comes out of it – and makes me excited for when we can have a bigger garden for fresh summer veggies:

The green onions and mini carrots (our pots aren't that deep) were delicious

The green onions and mini carrots (our pots aren’t that deep) were delicious

We’ve even been inspired to make refrigerator dill pickles since our dill plant was and is going slightly insane:

Taking this amount off did not even phase our dill plant. It's now waist high three weeks later.

Taking this amount off did not even phase our dill plant. It’s now waist high three weeks later.

 

Ingredients:
  • 12 oz white vinegar
  • 5 tbsp sea salt
  • 3/4 cups sugar
  • 3 oz white vinegar
  • 18 whole black pepper corns
  • 3 cloves garlic (we used crushed)
  • 1 bunch fresh dill
  • 6 cups cucumber, slices
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  • Step 1: Prepare brining liquid by combing 12 oz of white vinegar with salt and sugar. Simmer until both are dissolved, set aside to cool.
  • Step 2: In three pint jars add 1 oz white vinegar, 6 whole peppercorns, garlic and a generous handful of dill. I interpreted generous handful very generously:

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  • Step 3: Add the cucumbers and add the brining liquid. Shake.

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  • Step 4: Refrigerate until eaten. Keeps about 3 weeks.

Last week we harvested the last of our carrots. Some are really small because they didn’t have room to grow – you’re apparently supposed to thin them a few weeks after planting and I did.. kind of. I was too soft-hearted in pulling the little rootlets up, so I left too many. Next year I’ll know better.

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Curly Carrot

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Unfortunately every time we make home made tzatziki sauce we eat it up before I can get a picture, but we’re looking forward to more delicious recipes from our tiny “garden” throughout the summer!

 

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One thought on “In which we grow an herb garden

  1. Your granddaddy would be proud!! Beautiful garden and pickles! You can do potatoes in a plastic garbage can. Aunt Kathy has do that! Need some of your basil for tomato pie!!

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